Exhibition & Performances

The exhibition Cabinet Intervetions presents original sound, installation, text and performance within and around Pollok House. The works interpret, question and respond to the context and collections within the House, creating contemporary objects, events and interventions that initiate and frame new dialogues, relationships and practice.

 


Visiting Information

Exhibition dates: 20th April – 7th May 2018, 10am – 5pm
Three afternoons of scheduled artist performances/tours/events:
Friday 20th April, 3-6pm, Sunday 22nd April, 1-4pm & Saturday 28th April, 1-4pm

Pollok House, Pollok Country Park, 2060 Pollokshaws Road, G43 1AT
Tel: 0141 616 6410

Directions: Pollok House is in the middle of Pollok Country Park, approximately 1 mile from each entrance.
By car: Exit at Junction 1 of the M77. There is a signposted entrance to Pollok Country Park directly opposite the traffic lights at the end of the off ramp.
By train: Take the train from Glasgow Central to Pollokshaws West (approx. 10 mins). Turn left when leaving the station.


Performance schedule:

Friday 20th April, 3 – 6pm

3.00 Buzzard Feedback, a sound work situated in the car park at the front of the house. Duncan Marquiss
3.30 Flow Country: a 20min reading from a forthcoming book Jasper Coppes
4.00 I gladly strained my eyes to follow you, 45min guided tour of the house. Shauna McMullan
5.00 A cheek, the side of a nose, the white of an eye, the curve of an ear, 25min. reading, performed sat at a table with a glass of water. Sarah Forrest

Sunday 22nd April, 1 – 4pm

1.00 Buzzard Feedback, a sound work situated in the car park at the front of the house. Duncan Marquiss
1.30 Flow Country: a 20min reading from a forthcoming book Jasper Coppes
2.00 I gladly strained my eyes to follow you, 45min guided tour of the house. Shauna McMullan
2.30 Fings ain’t what they used to be (reprise), 5min performance intervention from afar. Ruth Barker
3.00 A cheek, the side of a nose, the white of an eye, the curve of an ear, 25min. reading, performed sat at a table with a glass of water. Sarah Forrest

Saturday 28th April, 1 – 4pm

2.00 I gladly strained my eyes to follow you, 45min guided tour of the house. Shauna McMullan
3.30 Buzzard Feedback, a sound work situated in the car park at the front of the house. Duncan Marquiss

*Shauna McMullan’s I gladly strained my eyes to follow you is scheduled 2pm daily


Ruth Barker

 

Feedgood Factor no. 8, Ruth Barker, 2018

I was walking up to the house this morning and I was feeling anxious.

It was raining, and I was overdressed and sweating.
I was wearing a sea green dress and I was thinking about sugar. I take sugar in my tea.

A performance intervention for Pollok House. Hello? Can you hear me?


Susan Brind & Jim Harold

 

Planting by the book – after John Stirling-Maxwell – consists of a portfolio, a photograph and a chart of full stops extracted from three texts on trees1. The work is intended as a proposition for the positioning and planting of trees in the landscape. It is a response to Sir John Stirling Maxwell’s passion for forestry. In this version, however, it becomes a schema for the placement of a group of jet spheres on the lawn at the back of Pollock House – jet, like coal, being wood in a fossilized form.

1. The texts referred to are as follows: Robert Graves, ‘The Tree Alphabet’ in The White Goddess; Fiona Stafford, ‘Buds, Bark and a Golden Bough’ in The Long, Long Life of Trees; and Jim Crumley, ‘The Great Woods’ in his book The Great Wood on Scotland’s woodlands.


Jasper Coppes

A sunny day in Sitka / A sombre day in Sitka, 13 litres of pollen from Sitka Spruce are dispersed throughout Pollok House. This powdery light-yellow substance is composed of microscopic grains that safeguard the offspring of the Sitka Spruce: a coniferous tree named after the Alaskan community of Sitka. The material was harvested in Scotland and generously donated by the Forestry Commission, but also a gift from the trees themselves – thanking their abundance in Scotland to Sir John, lover of trees and one of the last inhabitants of Pollok House. With his work, Dutch artist Jasper Coppes, revives these old relationships in the form of a feedback loop. Pollen becomes a metaphor for the spreading of information across the globe. But it also testifies to the coming and going of narratives with which we attribute purpose to our environment – and the lives we live in it.

Jasper Coppes, 2018


Alan Currall

 

Reflections on family portrait with self-portrait, 2018 (production still).

I counted fifteen mirrors in this house, but could never count the number of portraits.
Each painted portrait captures its sitter in a premeditated moment of their performative self.
Each mirror contains the pattern of reflected light for every face that ever looked into it.

In 1978 the physicist John Wheeler proposed ‘Wheeler’s delayed choice experiment’. This thought experiment employs the principle of the wave-particle duality of light to propose that light can ‘choose’ to be a wave or a particle depending on how it is subsequently measured. In short, this suggests that actions of the present can influence the past. Wheeler used the term “participatory universe” to describe a universe where all our minds are in some way deeply connected with the very fabric of space and time. For me, this opens up the imaginative potential for these mirrors as windows into time travel.

 


Sarah Forrest 

A cheek, the side of a nose, the white of an eye, the curve of an ear.

A woman’s voice plays into the room. She requests that you talk clearly, with certainty. She would like the truth, a mirror to reality, if you would.

You pick up the glass of water and you take a sip.

Sarah Forrest, 2018


Shona Macnaughton

The House Breaker

I am still alive, just.

Strong, tough and easily worked, my skills lie in housebuilding and furniture.

I am soft, light, with a reddish tinge and a characteristic odour.

Shona Macnaughton, 2018


Duncan Marquiss

 

Buzzard Feedback

A sound work that will be played in the car park at Pollok House at 1pm on Sunday 22nd April and 1pm Saturday 28th April. An accompanying pamphlet will be available in the exhibition.


Shauna McMullan

 

I gladly strained my eyes to follow you, Shauna McMullan, 2018

I gladly strained my eyes to follow you is a 45min guided tour of Pollok House looking at a selection of female portraits in the Houses’ collection. The content of the tour is made up of texts written specially for the work by invited writers, artists, academics and Pollok House staff. Contributors to the work: Sam Ainsley / Elaine Ang / Christine Borland / Jenny Brownrigg / Karen Cornfield / Kate Davis / Fiona Dean / Laura Edbrook / Moyna Flannigan / Laura Gonzalez / Victoria Horne / Kirsty Leonard / Jennie Macleod / Shauna McMullan / Adele Patrick / Sian Reynolds / Stephanie Smith / Sarah Tripp / Clara Ursitti


Joanna Peace

 

What kinds of times are these (watching the fire from her garden) Joanna Peace, 2017-2018

What kinds of times are these (watching the fire from her garden)

The ground we built our homes upon is giving way. A tower is burning and there is ash in the air. The coffee at the bottom of my cup is, today, unreadable. And still, we find ourselves in paradise, that walled garden. What do our eyes fix upon? What are their names?

A series of photographic light boxes and a story.